Saturday, March 9, 2013

Window Treatments with Style!



My good friend Gwen, also a designer, jokes that she "doesn't do windows", but that I've "never met a window I didn't want to treat"!  I guess she must be right.....  I never have liked bare windows!  To me, a room doesn't look complete until the windows have been treated in some way.  The first question I ask a client in determining how to treat their windows is whether they are trying to achieve privacy and/or light control, or if they just want to soften the window.  If privacy is the goal, there are few window treatments as effective and simple as a draw drapery, either hung on a decorative traverse rod, or on a regular traverse rod covered with an interesting valance.  These draperies can be extended, if wall space allows, so that very little of the actual window is covered when they are open.  Style can be added with various types of valances, an interesting metal or wood rod, or a coordinating trim.  The window above uses draw draperies highlighted with a vertically shirred valance mounted on a board, and is trimmed down the inner edges, at the hemline, and the bottom of the valance with a black scalloped fringe. Casually elegant!


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The other way to achieve privacy or light control is to use an exciting valance over a blind, shade or shutter.  There are so many great valance styles to choose from to suit your own personal taste and the mood of the room.  The valance above features inverted pleats, a shaped bottom hemline, and cascades at each side.  A coordinating fringe adds the finishing touch.


A relaxed roman shade (probably stationary)  with a contrasting inverted pleat in the center dresses this kitchen window in a well-designed, but tailored, style.


Another stationary roman shade valance is accented with a contrasting band and bow.  I love how they used the checks on the diagonal!


This little cutie looks like it might actually be a working shade, accented with a deep pleated ruffle at the bottom.


A relaxed roman shade can also be mounted on a rod instead of a board for added interest.


The two valances above use inverted pleats to keep the treatment simple and tailored.  Featuring either a straight bottom edge (top picture) or a scalloped bottom edge (second picture) changes the treatment from casual to dressy, and adding the side panels makes a more complete treatment for a living or dining room.


This very simple treatment doesn't take much fabric, but is very effective.  By lining it with a contrasting fabric, the roll at the bottom compliments the main fabric nicely.



Two fabrics always make a valance more interesting, and this one uses a tiny complementary check as the pleats and lining peaking out at the top.


Below, our designers talk about their favorite ways to treat a window........


Tina Tepe says "One of my favorite window treatments is a valance or side hangs installed using posts with medallions.  They can be a creative alternative to rods or valances mounted on boards.  You can install them following the structure of the window or you can create shape above the window frame.  This treatment can be traditional or contemporary depending on the fabric and trim selection."  Below are some examples.








Barbara Habas says "My favorite window treatment is a roman shade.  Simple to operate, it doesn't require too much fabric to construct.  A very tailored and clean look!  It's a wonderful treatment for French doors.  Another favorite treatment is a pair of pinch pleated draperies on a wrought iron rod.  Their style works well with most any decor.  It softens the window without being heavy, and will not obstruct your view in any way.  Always tasteful, never trendy!  Your fabric will dictate the style and will be a focal point and color scheme to follow throughout the room."  Below are some pictures of tailored roman shades.



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Tammi Yoder says "Window treatments are one of my favorite components of design.  I love to mix texture, pattern and color to create an interesting finish to a window!   Here are two examples of the same treatment--- a variation of a swag hung on a rod with tabs.  The first is a picture of a window in my own kitchen.  The black background as the dominant fabric pops the colors of its fruit print, while the yellow coordinate draws interest by adding texture and brightness.

The second picture is the same treatment but in a buttery yellow fabric.  Here they have added interest by using pleating across the bottom of the valance.  This adds softness and a bit of femininity.  The valance is hung on a white rod to give contrast with the yellow print while adding conformity to the color of the cabinetry."








Notice the roman shade on the door window, using the same two fabrics, but an entirely different, more practical, treatment.


All of our designers are experts in creating unique and custom window treatments, and would love to help you with the windows in your home.  Get started today by setting up an appointment for one of them to visit your home  (a $50.00 consultation fee applies), and see their amazing ideas for your windows!

8 comments:

  1. Choosing a window treatment can be overwhelming sometimes because there's a lot to choose from. But knowing the right things to consider, it could be fun. It's been months late, but reading your post is truly helpful. At least people will be aware on what window treatments they would consider for their windows. #Roxie @ WindowTreatmentsPhiladelphia.com

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  2. “To me, a room doesn't look complete until the windows have been treated in some way.” — I feel you, Carol. For me, a window that has no covering doesn’t look good because it seems like you’re being exposed to everyone. Anyway, one thing to consider when treating windows is that the color should coordinate with the upholstery. You can even use complimentary colors if you want to highlight your furniture set.

    Blake Bennett

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  4. Those are definitely great design options. Window treatments don't go one way only, neither do they have to be uniformed for the rest of the windows in the house. An impromptu catalog like that is important, not only to present each option for consideration, but to train the mind's eye towards adjusting to variation and of having several treatment strategies in operation at once.

    Greg Arnett @ Sunburst Shutters Arizona

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  5. Window treatments have been different themes, and windows looks gorgeous because of their beautiful decors, walls and flooring colors.We are also dealing in same industry hence found this informative to add in our process also. Summerdale Mills

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  6. Do you have patterns for any of these pictures? I am interested in the red/black fleur de lys pattern (relaxed roman shade). Any suggestions on where to find this pattern?

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  7. It is a great website.. The Design looks very good.. Keep working like that!.
    window treatments

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